Attitudes

Moses: A Lesson in Humility

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When I asked my daughter what “humility” meant to her, she said “It’s when you fart in class!” via GIPHY Like her, I think many people confuse humility with humiliation. But humility is something you practice voluntarily. Humiliation is often something done to you, a deeply embarrassing event, not an attitude. Humility is a result of grace, whereas humiliation is a result of shaming. Take a look at the Old Testament with me. It is peppered with exhortations like these: “If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear […]

Attitudes

Humility Brings Abundance

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Abundant life comes, paradoxically, through humility, not through “to do” lists. Among other descriptions, humility is realizing and accepting you can’t do it all. It is simply recognizing that you are a created being under God, that God is great and giving. It is not putting yourself down, or being a doormat for others. Most picture humility as a person kneeling and bowing, which is something we do only to those in great authority. Thus, we are focusing on who, not what or how, when we practice humility. As we bow to God and not our accomplishments, He gives us life. This morning I had […]

Attitudes

Parenting is a Puzzle

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I love being able to look ahead to a goal and work backward from that to establish the step before me today. It’s somewhat like making a puzzle, where you’ve got the top of the box to go by, and a zillion colorful cardboard bits jumbled before you. First step – flip them all right side up. Second step – find the edge pieces. Third step – study the picture and choose an obvious image to assemble first (don’t start with the sky!). Fourth step – keep doing this section by section, until – ta-da! – you have a completed picture! I apply this in […]

Attitudes

My Humble Dad

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As part of the 2018 series on cultivating a ‘Mary’ heart, I am focusing on humility for March.    Twenty years ago today, my father was turning fifty-three. I don’t recall whether I was able to call him for his birthday or not. Most likely I couldn’t, for I lived in rural Ukraine at the time, and phone lines were unreliable, and the internet did not stretch to my area. Today, I cannot call him either, for he died that year of 1998, and neither phone lines nor internet reach heaven. As far as we’ve come technologically in twenty years, there is still only one […]